Monthly Archives: July 2018

Of Family Reunions and High-Tech Talk

We’re just back from a family reunion. This get-together proved once again that texts and phone calls, letters and pictures don’t stack up to face-to-face communication. Among family, friends, neighbours, colleagues or even in our churches nothing cements relationships better that sharing time with people in person. Around a dining table, across the room, in a coffee shop, or across a neighbour’s fence.

The ostensible reason for our gathering was Mary Helen’s 80th birthday and he 50th wedding anniversary of Mary Helen’s youngest sister Annie Pearl and her husband from Tennessee. Another sister from Charleston, South Carolina came too. Two of Mary Helen’s sisters together after years apart! Sadly, a third sister couldn’t attend.

Our family joined the party. Our oldest son, Stephen and his wife Catherine came from Atlanta. Debbie and her family came to John and Shona’s home in Mississauga enjoy the memories. Missionary colleagues, Hugh Gordon and his family also came.

With Annie Pearl holding court, conversation never dragged nor laughter from her fund of apocryphal stories about Mary Helen’s childhood. Her other sister, Colie, filled in any lulls with her fund of anecdotes and jokes. Any one who knows Mary Helen, realizes that she has no problem conversing. These three sisters must have all eaten off the “talking beans” tree growing up. If only we could discover the secret and include it in chlorinated water. Society would be changed.

My point, however, concerns the power of face-to-face connection. Each person projected a persona that is missing from a text or phone call. We heard new stories. We came to understand each other better. As time passed conversation opened new insights into the work and ministry different ones were involved in. We even learned about the health challenges some of us face.

The few words in this blog cannot articulate the facial expressions, the emphases, the gestures of those who sat across from us. There is no substitute for time spent face-to-face with others.

Business and industry must learn this reality to rise above the cold technology that so many depend on for communication. Churches especially must realize that communicating to congregations sitting in rows side-by-side is not enough. Genuine discipleship will take place only as Jesus conducted it—in person, face-to-face with a few persons at a time. Jesus, although the Son of God, concentrated his main energies on twelve men. Despite their detractors, small groups can be an effective way to get to know people and inspire them to become effective disciples of Christ.

I’m sure I spend too much time on Facebook and Twitter, but I also participate in an early morning Bible study with six or seven men. It is a wonderful time of study, laughter, and fellowship. There is no substitute for face-to-face fellowship. It’s interesting that the current issue of Christianity Today, July/August 2018, contains two articles that make this point.

(Let me know your thoughts on this subject. Further articles, books, and stories at: http://www.countrywindow.ca Facebook: Eric E Wright Twitter: @EricEWright1 LinkedIn: Eric Wright ––

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